Top 25 Motor Oils – June, 2017

Here is the top 25 motor oils available.

Please remember that not all of these oils are available in all areas. Also any racing oils listed are not intended for long-term street use. Using race oils in street cars equipped with catalytic converters can damage them.

1. 0W40 Mobil 1 “FS” European Car Formula
2. 0W20 Quaker State Ultimate Durability
3. 5W30 Valvoline Full Synthetic High Mileage with MaxLife Technology
4. 5W30 Pentosin Pento Super Performance III
5. 5W20 Quaker State Ultimate Durability
6. 0W30 Gulf Competition
7. 5W30 Mobil 1, Advanced Full Synthetic
8. 10W30 Mobil 1, Advanced Full Synthetic
9. 5W30 Pennzoil Ultra
10. 5W20 Valvoline MaxLife High Mileage
11. 5W30 Mobil 1 ESP
12. 5W30 Quaker State Ultimate Durability
13. 5W30 Pennzoil Euro “AV” European Formula
14. 5W30 Motul 300V Ester Core 4T Racing Oil
15. 5W30 Mag 1, FMX, European Formula
16. 5W30 Oil Extreme Motor Oil
17. 5W40 Mag 1, FMX, European Formula
18. 5W30 Valvoline MaxLife High Mileage
19. 5W30 Castrol Edge
20. 10W30 Lucas Racing Only
21. CFS 0W30 NT Millers Nanodrive Racing Oil
22. 5W30 Mobil 1, Advanced Full Synthetic
23. 0W30 Amsoil Signature Series 25,000 miles
24. 5W30 Joe Gibbs Driven LS30 Performance Motor Oil
25. 10W30 Valvoline NSL (Not Street Legal) Conventional Racing Oil

And if you are looking for a mileage improvement, consider Pennzoil Platinum 5W30 Pure Synthetic. Working with my wife’s Nissan Versa Coupe, we have been able to verify a 2 mpg increase with this oil. The oil is made from natural gas so the base stock is cleaner – there must be something to it.

Top 25 Motor Oils – March, 2017

Here is the top 25 motor oils available.

Please remember that not all of these oils are available in all areas. Also any racing oils listed are not intended for long-term street use. Using race oils in street cars equipped with catalytic converters can damage them.

1. 0W40 Mobil 1 “FS” European Car Formula
2. 0W20 Quaker State Ultimate Durability
3. 5W30 Pentosin Pento Super Performance III
4. 5W20 Quaker State Ultimate Durability
5. 0W30 Gulf Competition
6. 5W30 Mobil 1, Advanced Full Synthetic
7. 10W30 Mobil 1, Advanced Full Synthetic
8. 5W30 Pennzoil Ultra
9. 5W20 Valvoline MaxLife High Mileage
10. 5W30 Mobil 1 ESP Formula
11. 5W30 Quaker State Ultimate Durability
12. 5W30 Pennzoil Euro “AV” European Formula
13. 5W30 Motul 300V Ester Core 4T Racing Oil
14. 5W30 Mag 1, FMX, European Formula
15. 5W30 Oil Extreme Motor Oil
16. 5W40 Mag 1, FMX
17. 5W30 Valvoline MaxLife High Mileage
18. 5W30 Castrol Edge Professional “LL03″
19. 10W30 Lucas Racing Only
20. CFS 0W30 NT Millers Nanodrive Racing Oil
21. 5W30 Mobil 1, Advanced Full Synthetic
22. 0W30 Amsoil Signature Series 25,000 miles
23. 5W30 Joe Gibbs Driven LS30 Performance Motor Oil
24. 10W30 Valvoline NSL (Not Street Legal) Conventional Racing Oil
25. 10W40 Valvoline MaxLife High Mileage

RGMOI – Oil Ranking Results – Part 3

The Wear Protection reference categories are:

• Over 105,000 psi = INCREDIBLE wear protection

• 90,000 to 105,000 psi = OUTSTANDING wear protection

• 75,000 to 90,000 psi = GOOD wear protection

• 60,000 to 75,000 psi = MODEST wear protection

• Below 60,000 psi = UNDESIRABLE wear protection

The HIGHER the psi value, the BETTER the Wear Protection.

The “WEAR PROTECTION RANKING LIST” itself, begins here:

1. Prolong Engine Treatment added to 5W30 Pennzoil Ultra, API SN synthetic = 136,658 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the Prolong Engine Treatment added to it, has a wear protection capability of 92,569 psi. With the recommended amount of Prolong added per qt, its wear protection capability “WENT UP 48%”.
The data here provides information on wear protection capability, but does NOT provide any information as to how compatible this product’s chlorine may be with a given oil’s additive package. Chlorine and additive package incompatibility has a possible risk of creating damaging bearing corrosion problems. There have been legal issues with this product that you can Google for yourself. Contact Prolong’s maker for more information on compatibility, to find out if it is safe to use in your application. The test data on Prolong is included in my Ranking List for informational purposes only, because of requests I have received about testing this product. But, I do not endorse nor recommend its use. It is always best to simply choose a highly ranked oil in the first place, and avoid using any aftermarket additives at all.
.
2. Prolong Engine Treatment added to 5W30 Castrol GTX, API SN conventional = 130,366 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the Prolong Engine Treatment added to it, has a wear protection capability of 95,392 psi. With the recommended amount of Prolong added per qt, its wear protection capability “WENT UP 37%”.
The data here provides information on wear protection capability, but does NOT provide any information as to how compatible this product’s chlorine may be with a given oil’s additive package. Chlorine and additive package incompatibility has a possible risk of creating damaging bearing corrosion problems. There have been legal issues with this product that you can Google for yourself. Contact Prolong’s maker for more information on compatibility, to find out if it is safe to use in your application. The test data on Prolong is included in my Ranking List for informational purposes only, because of requests I have received about testing this product. But, I do not endorse nor recommend its use. It is always best to simply choose a highly ranked oil in the first place, and avoid using any aftermarket additives at all.
.
3. 0W40 Mobil 1 “FS” European Car Formula, ACEA A3/B3, A3/B4, API SN, synthetic = 127,221 psi
This new oil replaces the older version called, 0W40 Mobil 1, European Formula, API SN, synthetic. See below for the older version’s ranking position.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This new “FS” version was tested in Summer 2016. This oil produced the highest psi value ever seen in my testing, from any motor oil just as it comes right out of the bottle, with no aftermarket additives. Very impressive.

I also went on to test this oil at the much higher temperature of 275*F. At that elevated temperature, any hotter and thinner oil is expected to experience a drop in Wear Protection Capability. This oil did have a 16% drop in capability. But, even at that elevated temperature, it produced an impressive 106,876 psi, which still kept this much hotter and thinner oil in the INCREDIBLE Wear Protection Category.

I also tested this oil to find out its onset of thermal breakdown, which was 280F.

4. 0W20 Quaker State Ultimate Durability, API SN, synthetic (gold bottle) = 124,393 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested in Spring 2016. The psi value of this oil, which came from testing it at the normal operating test temperature of 230*F, put it in the INCREDIBLE Wear Protection Category.

However, I went on to also test this oil at the much higher temperature of 275*F. At that elevated temperature, any hotter and thinner oil is expected to experience a drop in Wear Protection Capability. This oil did have a 14.7% drop in capability. But, even at that elevated temperature, it produced an impressive 106,163 psi, which still kept this much hotter and thinner oil in the INCREDIBLE Wear Protection Category.

5. 5W30 Pentosin Pento Super Performance III, for gas and diesel engines, API S”M”, ACEA C3, synthetic, made in Germany = 122,711 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested late 2016. For more information on this oil, see Tech Article 30.

6. 5W20 Quaker State Ultimate Durability, API SN, GM dexos 1 approved, synthetic (gold bottle) = 121,396 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested Fall 2015. The psi value of this oil, which came from testing it at the normal operating test temperature of 230*F, put it in the INCREDIBLE Wear Protection Category.

However, I went on to also test this oil at the much higher temperature of 275*F. At that elevated temperature, any hotter and thinner oil is expected to experience a drop in Wear Protection Capability. And this oil did have a significant 23% drop in capability. However, even at that reduced value down to 92,893 psi, this much hotter and thinner oil was in the OUTSTANDING Wear Protection Category.

7. 5W30 Mobil 1, Advanced Full Synthetic, API SN, GM dexos 1 approved = 117,799 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This was the latest current version of this oil when tested at the end of 2015. This oil is used by a number of Auto Makers worldwide as factory fill oil in their High Performance cars. The psi value of this oil, which came from testing it at the normal operating test temperature of 230*F, put it in the INCREDIBLE Wear Protection Category.

However, I went on to also test this oil at the much higher temperature of 275*F. At that elevated temperature, any hotter and thinner oil is expected to experience a drop in Wear Protection Capability. And this oil did have a disappointing 36% drop in capability. At that reduced value down to 75,861 psi, this much hotter and thinner oil dropped down to the GOOD Wear Protection Category. You can avoid such a drop in capability by keeping the oil at a more reasonable cooler temperature.

8. Prolong Engine Treatment added to 5W30 Pennzoil, API SN conventional (yellow bottle) = 117,028 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the Prolong Engine Treatment added to it, has a wear protection capability of 76,989 psi. With the recommended amount of Prolong added per qt, its wear protection capability “WENT UP 52%”.

The data here provides information on wear protection capability, but does NOT provide any information as to how compatible this product’s chlorine may be with a given oil’s additive package. Chlorine and additive package incompatibility has a possible risk of creating damaging bearing corrosion problems. There have been legal issues with this product that you can Google for yourself. Contact Prolong’s maker for more information on compatibility, to find out if it is safe to use in your application. The test data on Prolong is included in my Ranking List for informational purposes only, because of requests I have received about testing this product. But, I do not endorse nor recommend its use. It is always best to simply choose a highly ranked oil in the first place, and avoid using any aftermarket additives at all.

9. 10W30 Mobil 1, Advanced Full Synthetic, API SN = 115,635 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested at the end of 2015.

10. 5W30 Pennzoil Ultra, API SM synthetic = 115,612 psi
zinc = 806 ppm
phosphorus = 812 ppm
moly = 66 ppm
calcium = 3,011 ppm
TBN = 10.3
This oil is no longer available and has been replaced by newer API “SN” versions a couple of times. See below for the current “SN” version’s ranking position.

11. 5W20 Valvoline MaxLife High Mileage, API SN, dexos 1 approved, synthetic blend (red bottle) = 114,125 psi
High Mileage oils are formulated for older engines with over 75,000 miles on them. And High Mileage oils include “Seal Swell” chemicals to help reduce oil leakage in those older engines.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested Spring 2016.

12. 5W30 Mobil 1 ESP Formula (Emission System Protection), for diesel and gas engines, ACEA C2, C3, API SN, synthetic = 113,836 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested late 2016. For more information on this oil, see Tech Article 30.

13. 5W30 Quaker State Ultimate Durability, API SN, GM dexos 1 approved, synthetic (gold bottle) = 113,377 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This was the latest current version of this oil when tested at the end of 2015. The psi value of this oil, which came from testing it at the normal operating test temperature of 230*F, put it in the INCREDIBLE Wear Protection Category.

However, I went on to also test this oil at the much higher temperature of 275*F. At that elevated temperature, any hotter and thinner oil is expected to experience a drop in Wear Protection Capability. But, this oil only had a very small 3.7% drop in capability. And even at that elevated temperature, it produced an extremely impressive 109,211 psi, which still kept this much hotter and thinner oil in the INCREDIBLE Wear Protection Category.

14. 5W30 Pennzoil Euro “AV” European Formula, for diesel and gas engines, ACEA C3, API SN, synthetic = 112,664 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested late 2016. For more information on this oil, see Tech Article 30.

15. 5W30 Motul 300V Ester Core 4T Racing Oil, synthetic = 112,464 psi
This Motorcycle Road Racing oil is from France and comes in liter bottles (slightly more than a quart). At the time this oil was tested in spring 2014, it cost $24.25 per bottle. And with the shipping cost added to that, the final cost was about $33.00 per bottle (shipping was all inside the U.S.), making it THE most expensive motor oil I’ve ever tested.
zinc = 1724 ppm
phosphorus = 1547 ppm
moly = 481 ppm
calcium = 3141 ppm
TBN = 7.4
This oil contains sufficient amounts of the components required (detergent, acid neutralizer, etc) for normal change intervals in street driven vehicles. But, it has way too much zinc/phos for use in cat equipped vehicles. However, it is well suited for Race Cars, Street Hotrods and Classic cars.

16. 5W30 Mag 1, FMX, European Formula, API S”M”, ACEA C3-08, synthetic, for gas and diesel cars and light trucks = 111,622 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested Spring 2016.

However, I went on to also test this oil at the much higher temperature of 275*F. At that elevated temperature, any hotter and thinner oil is expected to experience a drop in Wear Protection Capability. And this oil did experience a 17.1% drop in capability. But, even at that elevated temperature, it produced 92,508 psi, which still put this much hotter and thinner oil in the OUTSTANDING Wear Protection Category.

I also tested this oil to find out its onset of thermal breakdown, which was at 280*F.

17. “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to 5W30 Pennzoil Ultra, API SM synthetic = 111,570 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to it, has a wear protection capability of 115,612 psi. But, with 2.0 OZ of concentrate added per qt, which is the amount intended for racing, its wear protection capability “WENT DOWN 3.5%”.
zinc = TBD
phosphorus = TBD.
moly = TBD
calcium = TBD
TBN = TBD

18. “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to 10W30 Brad Penn, Penn Grade 1 semi-synthetic = 111,061psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to it, has a wear protection capability of only 71,206 psi. But, with 2.0 OZ of concentrate added per qt, which is the amount intended for racing, its wear protection capability “WENT UP A BREATH TAKING 56%”.
zinc = TBD
phosphorus = TBD.
moly = TBD
calcium = TBD
TBN = TBD

19. 5W30 Oil Extreme Motor Oil, API SM synthetic (per the Oil Company, even though synthetic wording is not shown on the label) = 110,286 psi
The Company claims this oil contains their proprietary formula of calcium petroleum sulfontate EP (Extreme Pressure) technology that is NOT found in any other motor oil. They also claim that it will provide 5 to 7 more HP, 7 to 10% better fuel mileage, cut engine wear in half, and will extend drain intervals two or three times safely. This oil is endorsed and promoted by Tech Author David Vizard. And he was so impressed by this oil’s performance that he also became a share holder in the Company. The results from the “Dynamic Wear Testing Under Load” performed here, fully supports their claim regarding wear protection. So, their hype about that, turned out to be absolutely true. And since this oil beat nearly every high zinc oil I’ve ever tested, it also proved another one of their claims, that using zinc as the primary anti-wear component, is outdated technology.
zinc = 765 ppm
phosphorus = 624 ppm
moly = 52 ppm
calcium = 7,652 ppm
TBN = 23.2

20. 5W40 Mag 1, FMX, European Formula, API SN, ACEA A3/B4, synthetic, for gas and diesel cars and light trucks = 109,147 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested Spring 2016.

21. 5W30 Valvoline MaxLife High Mileage, API SN, synthetic blend (red bottle) = 108,045 psi
High Mileage oils are formulated for older engines with over 75,000 miles on them. And High Mileage oils include “Seal Swell” chemicals to help reduce oil leakage in those older engines.
zinc = TBD
phosphorus =TBD
moly = TBD
This is an earlier version that is no longer available. It has been replaced by a new formula version that now has GM dexos 1 approval. See below for the new version’s ranking position.

22. 5W30 Castrol Edge Professional “LL03”, for diesel engines, ACEA C3, gold bottle, synthetic = 107,067 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested late 2016. For more information on this oil, see Tech Article 30.

23. 10W30 Lucas Racing Only synthetic = 106,505 psi
zinc = 2642 ppm
phosphorus = 3489 ppm
moly = 1764 ppm
calcium = 2,929 ppm
TBN = 9.0
NOTE: This oil is suitable for short term racing use only, and is not suitable for street use.

24. CFS 0W30 NT Millers Nanodrive Racing Oil, API SM synthetic = 105,907 psi
This oil is from England, comes in liter bottles (slightly more than a quart), and it uses a nanotechnology formulation. At the time this oil was tested in fall 2013, it cost $22.45 per bottle. And with the shipping cost added to that, the final cost was about $28.00 per bottle (shipping was all inside the U.S.), making it one of the most expensive oils I’ve ever tested.
zinc = TBD, but the maker claims it has approximately 1100 ppm ZDDP.
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
calcium = TBD
TBN = TBD

25. 5W30 Mobil 1, Advanced Full Synthetic, API SN = 105,875 psi
zinc = 801 ppm
phosphorus = 842 ppm
moly = 112 ppm
calcium = 799 ppm
TBN = 7.5
This is an earlier version that is no longer available. It has been replaced by a new formula version that now has GM dexos 1 approval. See above for the new version’s ranking position.

26. “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to 10W30 Lucas Hot Rod & Classic Hi-Performance Oil conventional = 105,758 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to it, has a wear protection capability of only 62,538 psi. But, with 2.0 OZ of concentrate added per qt, which is the amount intended for racing, its wear protection capability “WENT UP A MIND BLOWING 69%”.
zinc = TBD
phosphorus = TBD
moly = TBD
calcium = TBD
TBN = TBD

27. 0W30 Amsoil Signature Series 25,000 miles, API SN synthetic = 105,008 psi
zinc = 824 ppm
phosphorus = 960 ppm
moly = 161 ppm
calcium = 3,354 ppm
TBN = 11.4

28. 5W30 Joe Gibbs Driven LS30 Performance Motor Oil, synthetic = 104,487 psi
The bottle says it is formulated specifically for high output GM LS engines, and that no ZDDP or additives required. This is by far, the best performing Joe Gibbs oil I’ve ever tested. It is at the very top of the OUTSTANDING wear protection category, and fell just short of the INCREDIBLE wear protection category.
zinc = 1610 ppm
phosphorus = 1496 ppm
moly = 0 ppm
calcium = 3515 ppm
TBN = 8.8
This oil contains sufficient amounts of the components required (detergent, acid neutralizer, etc) for normal change intervals in street driven vehicles. But, it has way too much zinc/phos for use in cat equipped vehicles. However, it is well suited for Race Cars, Street Hotrods and Classic cars.

29. 10W30 Valvoline NSL (Not Street Legal) Conventional Racing Oil = 103,846 psi
zinc = 1669 ppm
phosphorus = 1518 ppm
moly = 784 ppm
calcium = 1,607 ppm
TBN = 4.4
NOTE: This oil is suitable for short term racing use only, and is not suitable for street use. Since this testing was performed, Valvoline has discontinued this oil.

30. 10W40 Valvoline MaxLife High Mileage, API SN, synthetic blend (red bottle) = 103,840 psi
High Mileage oils are formulated for older engines with over 75,000 miles on them. And High Mileage oils include “Seal Swell” chemicals to help reduce oil leakage in those older engines.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested at the end of 2015. The psi value of this oil, which came from testing it at the normal operating test temperature of 230*F, put it in the OUTSTANDING Wear Protection Category.

However, I went on to also test this oil at the much higher temperature of 275*F. At that elevated temperature, any hotter and thinner oil is expected to experience a drop in Wear Protection Capability. And this oil did have a significant 25% drop in capability. At that reduced value down to 77,817 psi, this much hotter and thinner oil dropped to the GOOD Wear Protection Category.

31. 5W50 Motorcraft, API SN synthetic = 103,517 psi
zinc = 606 ppm
phosphorus = 742 ppm
moly = 28 ppm
calcium = 1,710 ppm
TBN = 6.7

32. 10W30 Valvoline VR1 Conventional Racing Oil (silver bottle) = 103,505 psi
zinc = 1472 ppm
phosphorus = 1544 ppm
moly = 3 ppm
calcium = 2,707 ppm
TBN = 7.6

33. 5W30 Amsoil Series 3000 Heavy Duty Diesel Oil synthetic, API CI-4 PLUS, CF, SL, ACEA A3/B3, E2, E3, E5, E7 = 102,642 psi.
This oil is Engineered for Diesel engines not equipped with Diesel particulate filters (DPF). Amsoil says this oil delivers better wear protection than other popular Diesel oils. And in this case, their hype is absolutely true. They also say it effectively reduces fuel consumption, with its advanced fuel efficient formula. This oil costs $11.15 per quart in the 2013 Amsoil Factory Direct Retail Catalog, which is 10% more than Amsoil’s 5W40 Premium Synthetic Diesel Oil. So, in this case, you pay only 10% more for the Amsoil Series 3000 Heavy Duty Diesel Oil, but you get a whopping 33% more wear protection than you get with the Amsoil’s 5W40 Premium Synthetic Diesel Oil. Money very well spent, if you run a Diesel oil intended for engines not equipped with Diesel particulate filters. This 5W30 Amsoil Series 3000 Heavy Duty Diesel Oil is one of the very best Diesel oils I have tested.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

34.  5W30 Pennzoil High Mileage Vehicle, API SN, conventional = 102,402 psi
High Mileage oils are formulated for older engines with over 75,000 miles on them. And High Mileage oils include “Seal Swell” chemicals to help reduce oil leakage in those older engines.
zinc = TBD
phos =TBD
moly = TBD

35. “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to 5W30 Mobil 1, API SN synthetic = 102,059 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to it, has a wear protection capability of 105,875 psi. But, with 2.0 OZ of concentrate added per qt, which is the amount intended for racing, its wear protection capability “WENT DOWN 3.6%”.
zinc = TBD
phosphorus = TBD.
moly = TBD
calcium = TBD
TBN = TBD

36. 0W20 Toyota Motor Oil, API SN, synthetic = 101,460 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested Spring 2016.

37. 5W40 Joe Gibbs DT40, synthetic = 101,265 psi
This oil claims to be formulated specifically for modern Sports Car engines, yet it has no API certifications at all, and claims to have a ZDDP anti-wear package, which would indicate that it does not have low enough zinc/phos levels to be safely used in modern cat equipped vehicles.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested at the end of 2015.
38. 10W30 Valvoline VR1 Synthetic Racing Oil, API SL (black bottle) = 101,139 psi
zinc = 1180 ppm
phosphorus = 1112 ppm
moly = 162 ppm
calcium = 2,664 ppm
TBN = 7.4

39. “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to 5W30 Pennzoil, API SN conventional (yellow bottle) = 100,252 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to it, has a wear protection capability of only 76,989 psi. But, with 1.5 OZ of concentrate added per qt, which is the bottle’s instruction for street driven vehicles, its wear protection capability “WENT UP A WHOPPING 30%”.
zinc = 970 ppm
phosphorus = 749 ppm, this value is 91 ppm lower than the basic oil because the concentrate has less phosphorus in it, which diluted the overall ppm count of the mixture.
moly = 285 ppm
calcium = 4,443 ppm
TBN = 18.8

40.  0W20 Mobil 1 Extended Performance, API SN, dexos 1 approved, synthetic = 100,229 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested in Spring 2016.

41. 5W30 Chevron Supreme, API SN conventional (blue bottle) = 100,011 psi
This oil only cost $4.29 per quart at an Auto Parts Store when I bought it.
zinc = 1018 ppm
phos = 728 ppm
moly = 161 ppm

42. 5W20 Castrol Edge with Titanium, API SN synthetic (gold bottle) = 99,983 psi
zinc = 1042 ppm
phos = 857 ppm
moly = 100 ppm
titanium = 49 ppm
This is an earlier version that is no longer available. It has been replaced by 5W20 Castrol Edge Extended Performance (gold bottle). See below for its ranking position.

43. 5W30 Pennzoil Platinum, API SN synthetic = 99,949 psi
This was the original API SN version, that was NOT made from natural gas.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

44. “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to 5W30 Pennzoil, API SN conventional (yellow bottle) = 99,529 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to it, has a wear protection capability of only 76,989 psi. But, with 2.0 OZ of concentrate added per qt, which is the amount intended for racing, its wear protection capability “WENT UP 29%”.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

45. 5W30 Pennzoil “Ultra” Platinum, Pure Plus Technology, made from pure natural gas, API SN, GM dexos 1 approved = 99,039 psi
This oil was introduced in 2014, and comes in a dark gray bottle with a blue vertical stripe on the label.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
The psi value of this oil, which came from testing it at the normal operating test temperature of 230*F, put it in the OUTSTANDING Wear Protection Category.

However, I went on to also test this oil late in 2015, at the much higher temperature of 275*F. At that elevated temperature, any hotter and thinner oil is expected to experience a drop in Wear Protection Capability. But, this oil had only an extremely small 2.7% drop in capability, the smallest drop I have seen. And at that reduced value down to 96,363 psi, this much hotter and thinner oil was still in the OUTSTANDING Wear Protection Category.
46. “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to 5W30 Oil Extreme Motor Oil, API SM synthetic = 98,396 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to it, has a wear protection capability of 110,286 psi. But, with 2.0 OZ of concentrate added per qt, which is the amount intended for racing, its wear protection capability “WENT DOWN 11%”.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

47. “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to 5W30 Pennzoil, API SN conventional, yellow bottle = 97,651 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to it, has a wear protection capability of only 76,989 psi. But, with 3.0 OZ of concentrate added per qt, its wear protection capability “WENT UP 27%”.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

48. 10W40 Pennzoil High Mileage Vehicle, API SN, conventional = 97,419 psi
High Mileage oils are formulated for older engines with over 75,000 miles on them. And High Mileage oils include “Seal Swell” chemicals to help reduce oil leakage in those older engines.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested at the end of 2015.

49. 10W30 Amsoil Dominator Racing Oil synthetic = 97,118 psi
zinc = 1613 ppm
phos = 1394 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

50. 5W30 Pennzoil Platinum Euro “L”, made from natural gas, for diesel and gas engines, ACEA C3, GM dexos “2” approved, API SN, synthetic = 97,051 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested late 2016. For more information on this oil, see Tech Article 30.

51. “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to 5W30 Pennzoil, API SN conventional, yellow bottle = 96,739 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to it, has a wear protection capability of only 76,989 psi. But, with 4.0 OZ of concentrate added per qt, its wear protection capability “WENT UP 26%”.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

52. 20W50 Castrol GTX, API SN conventional = 96,514 psi
zinc = 610 ppm
phos = 754 ppm
moly = 94 ppm

53. 30 wt Red Line Race Oil synthetic = 96,470 psi
zinc = 2207 ppm
phos = 2052 ppm
moly = 1235 ppm
NOTE: This oil is suitable for short term racing use only, and is not suitable for street use.

54. 0W20 Mobil 1 Advanced Fuel Economy, API SN synthetic = 96,364 psi
zinc = 742 ppm
phos = 677 ppm
moly = 81 ppm
This is an earlier version of this oil that did not have dexos 1 approval. See below for the later version of this oil that does have dexos 1 approval.

55. 5W30 Quaker State Ultimate Durability, API SN synthetic = 95,920 psi
zinc = 877 ppm
phos = 921 ppm
moly = 72 ppm
This is an earlier version that is no longer available. It has been replaced by a new formula version that now has GM dexos 1 approval. See above for the new version’s ranking position.

56. 5W30 Castrol Edge with Titanium, API SN synthetic (gold bottle) = 95,717 psi
zinc = 818 ppm
phos = 883 ppm
moly = 90 ppm
titanium = 44 ppm
This is an earlier version that is no longer available. It has been replaced by 5W30 Castrol Edge Extended Performance (gold bottle). See below for its ranking position.

57. 10W30 Joe Gibbs XP3 NASCAR Racing Oil synthetic = 95,543 psi
zinc = 743 ppm
phos = 802 ppm
moly = 1125 ppm
NOTE: This oil is suitable for short term racing use only, and is not suitable for street use.

58. 5W20 Castrol GTX, API SN conventional = 95,543 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
NOTE: The two oils above were tested weeks apart, but due to the similarities in their wear scar sizes, their averages ended up the same.

59. 5W30 Castrol GTX, API SN conventional = 95,392 psi
zinc = 830 ppm
phos = 791 ppm
moly = 1 ppm

60. 10W30 Amsoil Z-Rod Oil synthetic = 95,360 psi
zinc = 1431 ppm
phos = 1441 ppm
moly = 52 ppm

61. 5W30 Havoline, API SN conventional = 95,098 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

62. 5W30 Valvoline SynPower, API SN synthetic = 94,942 psi
zinc = 969 ppm
phos = 761 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

63. “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to 5W30 Chevron Supreme, API SN conventional = 94,864 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to it, has a wear protection capability of 100,011 psi. But, with 2.0 OZ of concentrate added per qt, which is the amount intended for racing, its wear protection capability “WENT DOWN 5.1%”.
zinc = TBD
phosphorus = TBD.
moly = TBD

64. 5W30 Valvoline Premium Conventional, API SN = 94,744 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

65. 5W20 Mobil 1, Advanced Full Synthetic , API SN synthetic = 94,663 psi
zinc = 764 ppm
phos = 698 ppm
moly = 76 ppm
This is an earlier version that is no longer available. It has been replaced by 5W20 Mobil 1 that includes GM dexos 1 approval. See below for its ranking position.

66. 5W20 Valvoline SynPower, API SN synthetic = 94,460 psi
zinc = 1045 ppm
phos = 742 ppm
moly = 0 ppm
This is an earlier version that is no longer available. It has been replaced by 5W20 Valvoline SynPower that includes GM dexos 1 approval. See below for its ranking position.

67. 10W40 Mobil 1 Racing 4T, four stroke Motorcycle oil, synthetic = 93,661 psi
This oil claims to meet or exceed API SN.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

68. 5W30 Eneos, API SN, synthetic = 93,135 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

69.  5W40 High Performance Lubricants Racing Oil, synthetic = 92,693 psi
The bottle calls this oil, “Bad Ass”.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested Summer 2016.

70. 5W30 Valvoline MaxLife High Mileage, API SN, GM dexos 1 approved, synthetic blend (red bottle) = 92,639 psi
High Mileage oils are formulated for older engines with over 75,000 miles on them. And High Mileage oils include “Seal Swell” chemicals to help reduce oil leakage in those older engines.
zinc = TBD
phos =TBD
moly = TBD
This was the latest current version of this oil when tested at the end of 2015. The psi value of this oil, which came from testing it at the normal operating test temperature of 230*F, put it in the OUTSTANDING Wear Protection Category.

However, I went on to also test this oil at the much higher temperature of 275*F. At that elevated temperature, any hotter and thinner oil is expected to experience a drop in Wear Protection Capability. And this oil did have an 8.3% drop in capability. At that reduced value down to 84,928 psi, this much hotter and thinner oil dropped to the GOOD Wear Protection Category.
71. 5W30 Pennzoil Ultra, API SN synthetic = 92,569 psi
This was the original API SN version, that was NOT made from natural gas.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
The older API “SM” version of this oil, produced a wear protection capability value of 115,612 psi.

72.  0W20 Pennzoil Platinum, Pure Plus Technology, made from Natural Gas, API SN, synthetic
(silver bottle with blue vertical stripe on the label) = 92,504 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested in Spring 2016.

73. 5W30 Lucas, API SN conventional = 92,073 psi
zinc = 992 ppm
phos = 760 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

74. 5W30 O’Reilly (house brand), API SN conventional = 91,433 psi
This oil only cost $3.99 per quart at an Auto Parts Store when I bought it.
zinc = 863 ppm
phos = 816 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

75.  5W30 Castrol GTX High Mileage, API SN, synthetic blend = 91,404 psi
High Mileage oils are formulated for older engines with over 75,000 miles on them. And High Mileage oils include “Seal Swell” chemicals to help reduce oil leakage in those older engines.
zinc = TBD
phos =TBD
moly = TBD

76. 5W30 Maxima RS530 Synthetic Racing Oil = 91,162 psi
zinc = 2162 ppm
phos = 2294 ppm
moly = 181 ppm

77. 5W30 Red Line, API SN synthetic = 91,028 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

78.  0W20 Castrol Edge, Fluid Titanium Technology, API SN, dexos 1 approved, synthetic
(black bottle) = 90,745 psi
zinc = TBD
phos =TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested in Spring 2016.
79. 5W20 Royal Purple API SN synthetic = 90,434 psi
zinc = 964 ppm
phos = 892 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

80. 10W30 Quaker State Defy High Mileage, API SL semi-synthetic = 90,226 psi
Defy has always been a High Mileage oil since it was first introduced. But, “High Mileage” hasn’t always been prominently displayed on the front label. Newer bottles do now prominently display “High Mileage” on the front label. High Mileage oils are formulated for older engines with over 75,000 miles on them. And High Mileage oils include “Seal Swell” chemicals to help reduce oil leakage in those older engines.
zinc = 1221 ppm
phos = 955 ppm
moly = 99 ppm

81. 10W60 Castrol TWS Motorsport, API SJ conventional = 90,163 psi
This oil is manufactured in Europe and is sold in the US for BMW models M3, M5, M6, Z4M, and Z8.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

82. 5W20 Valvoline Premium Conventional, API SN = 90,144 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

83. “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to 5W30 Castrol GTX, API SN conventional = 89,659 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to it, has a wear protection capability of 95,392 psi. But, with 2.0 OZ of concentrate added per qt, which is the amount intended for racing, its wear protection capability “WENT DOWN 6%”.
zinc = TBD
phosphorus = TBD.
moly = TBD

84.  0W20 Valvoline SynPower, API SN, synthetic = 89,556 psi
zinc = TBD
phos =TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested in Spring 2016.

85. 5W30 Havoline, API SN synthetic = 89,406 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

86. 5W30 Penrite 10 Tenths Racing 5, synthetic = 88,992 psi
This oil comes from Australia in 1 liter bottles (slightly more than a quart), and can be ordered in the U.S. from Summit Racing Equipment. It claims low friction for max power, and says it is not suitable for motorcycles with wet clutches. It also claims to have a full zinc formula.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

87. 30 wt Castrol Heavy Duty, API SM conventional = 88,089 psi
zinc = 907 ppm
phos = 829 ppm
moly = 56 ppm

88.  5W30 Mobil 1 High Mileage, API SL, synthetic = 88,081 psi
High Mileage oils are formulated for older engines with over 75,000 miles on them. And High Mileage oils include “Seal Swell” chemicals to help reduce oil leakage in those older engines.
zinc = TBD
phos =TBD
moly = TBD

89. 20W50 LAT Synthetic Racing Oil, API SM = 87,930 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

90. 5W30 Valvoline Nextgen 50% Recycled Oil, API SN conventional = 87,563 psi
zinc = 947 ppm
phos = 778 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

91. 5W30 Pennzoil Platinum, Pure Plus Technology, made from pure natural gas, API SN = 87,241 psi
This oil was introduced in 2014, and comes in a silver bottle with a blue vertical stripe on the label.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

92. 5W50 Mobil 1, API SN, synthetic = 86,456 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

93. 10W30 Joe Gibbs HR4 Hotrod Oil synthetic = 86,270 psi
zinc = 1247 ppm
phos = 1137 ppm
moly = 24 ppm

94. 5W20 Pennzoil Ultra, API SM synthetic = 86,034 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

95. 5W20 Mobil 1, API SN, GM dexos 1 approved, synthetic = 85,893 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This was the latest current version of this oil when tested Fall 2015

96. 15W40 RED LINE Diesel Oil synthetic, API CJ-4/CI-4 PLUS/CI-4/CF/CH-4/CF-4/SM/SL/SH/EO-O = 85,663 psi
zinc = 1615 ppm
phos = 1551 ppm
moly = 173 ppm

97. 5W30 Castrol Edge w/Syntec, API SN synthetic (formerly Castrol Syntec), (black bottle) = 85,179 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

98. 20W50 Millers Classic Performance Oil, API SJ, conventional = 84,764 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
Claims high ZDDP level. It comes from England in 1 Liter bottles, which is slightly more than a quart, and is available in the U.S.

99. 5W30 Schaeffer’s Supreme 9000, API SN, synthetic = 84,118 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

100. 5W30 Royal Purple API SN synthetic = 84,009 psi
zinc = 942 ppm
phos = 817 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

101. 20W50 Royal Purple API SN synthetic = 83,487 psi
zinc = 588 ppm
phos = 697 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

102. 20W50 Kendall GT-1 High Performance with liquid titanium, API SN conventional = 83,365 psi
zinc = 991 ppm
phos = 1253 ppm
moly = 57 ppm
titanium = 84 ppm

103. 5W30 Mobil 1 Extended Performance 15,000 mile, API SN synthetic = 83,263 psi
zinc = 890 ppm
phos = 819 ppm
moly = 104 ppm

104. 0W20 Castrol Edge with Titanium, API SN synthetic (gold bottle) = 82,867 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

105. 0W40 Mobil 1, European Formula, API SN, made in the U.S., synthetic = 82,644 psi
This is an earlier version that has been replaced by 0W40 Mobil 1 “FS” European Car Formula. See above for the newer version’s ranking position.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

106. 0W40 Pennzoil Ultra, API SN, synthetic = 81,863 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

107. 5W30 LAT Synthetic Racing Oil, API SM = 81,800 psi
zinc = 1784 ppm
phos = 1539 ppm
moly = 598 ppm

108. “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to 5W30 Royal Purple XPR (extreme performance racing oil) synthetic = 81,723 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to it, has a wear protection capability of only 74,860 psi. But, with 2.0 OZ of concentrate added per qt, which is the amount intended for racing, its wear protection capability “WENT UP 9%”.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

109. 0W30 Mobil 1, API SN, Advanced Fuel Economy, synthetic = 81,240 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD.
moly = TBD

110. 5W30 Peak, API SN synthetic = 80,716 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

111. 0W20 Mobil 1 Advanced Fuel Economy, API SN, dexos 1 approved, synthetic = 79,612
psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested in Spring 2016. At that time, this was the latest current version of this oil.

112. 5W30 Edelbrock “Cat-Safe”, API SM synthetic = 78,609 psi
This oil is made for Edelbrock by Torco
zinc = 924 ppm
phos = 659 ppm
moly = 28 ppm

113. 30wt Amsoil Break-In Oil conventional = 78,192 psi
zinc = 2051 ppm
phos = 1917 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

114. 20W50 Resolute Racing Oil, API SN conventional = 77,554 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil cost only $2.49 per quart when bought for this test. It is a Regional Oil from the Mid-Western U.S. farm country.

115. 5W40 Amsoil Premium Diesel Oil synthetic, API CJ-4, CI-4 PLUS, CF, SN, SM, ACEA E7, E9 = 77,207 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

116. 10W30 Renegade Pro Series Racing Oil, synthetic blend = 77,136 psi
zinc = TBD, but bottle claims over 3000 ppm
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

117. 15W40 ROYAL PURPLE Diesel Oil synthetic, API CJ-4 /SM, CI-4 PLUS, CH-4, CI-4 = 76,997 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

118. 5W30 Pennzoil, API SN conventional (yellow bottle) = 76,989 psi
zinc = 839 ppm
phos = 840 ppm
moly = 267 ppm

119. 10W40 Chevron Supreme, API SN conventional (blue bottle) = 76,806 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

120. 5W30 Lucas API SM synthetic = 76,584 psi
zinc = 1134 ppm
phos = 666 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

121. 5W30 GM’s AC Delco dexos 1 API SN semi-synthetic = 76,501 psi
zinc = 878 ppm
phos = 758 ppm
moly = 72 ppm

122. 10W30 Mobil Super 5000, API SN, conventional = 76,461 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested at the end of 2015.

123. 5W30 Motul 8100 X-clean, API SM, synthetic = 76,166 psi
This oil is made in France, and comes in a 1 liter bottle, which = 1.05 qts
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
For reference, 5W30 Motul 300V Ester Core 4T Racing Oil, synthetic, produced a wear protection capability of 112,464 psi

124. 20W50 Mobil 1 V-Twin 4 Cycle Motorcycle Oil, API SJ, synthetic = 75,855 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

125. 5W50 Castrol Edge with Syntec, API SN synthetic (formerly Castrol Syntec), (black bottle) = 75,409 psi
zinc = 1252 ppm
phos = 1197 ppm
moly = 71 ppm

126. 5W30 Castrol Edge Extended Performance, API SN, GM dexos 1 approved, synthetic (gold bottle) = 74,899 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This was the latest current version of this oil when tested Fall 2015.

127. “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to 10W30 Comp Cams Muscle Car & Street Rod Oil semi-synthetic = 74,874 psi
This oil on its own WITHOUT the “Oil Extreme concentrate” added to it, has a wear protection capability of only 60,413 psi. But, with 2.0 OZ of concentrate added per qt, which is the amount intended for racing, its wear protection capability “WENT UP AN IMPRESSIVE 24%”.
zinc = TBD
phosphorus = TBD.
moly = TBD

128. 5W30 Royal Purple XPR (Extreme Performance Racing) synthetic = 74,860 psi
zinc = 1421 ppm
phos = 1338 ppm
moly = 204 ppm

129. 15W40 Cenpeco (Central Petroleum Company) S-3 Diesel Oil, conventional, API CI-4, CH-4, CG-4, CF, CE, CD, SL, SJ, SH = 74,593 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

130. 5W40 MOBIL 1 TURBO DIESEL TRUCK synthetic, API CJ-4, CI-4 Plus, CI-4, CH-4 and ACEA E7 = 74,312 psi
zinc = 1211 ppm
phos = 1168 ppm
moly = 2 ppm

131. 0W50 Mobil 1 Racing Oil = 73,811 psi
zinc = 1676 ppm
phos = 1637 ppm
moly = 1263 ppm

132. 5W30 Peak, API SN conventional = 73,690 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

133. 5W30 Mobil Super Synthetic, API SN, GM dexos 1 approved = 73,601 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

134. 5W30 Castrol GTX Magnatec, API SN, GM dexos 1 approved, synthetic blend = 73,566 psi
This oil claims to have molecules that cling to parts, forming an extra layer of protection during warm-up, reducing engine wear.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

135. 15W40 CHEVRON DELO 400LE Diesel Oil, conventional, API CJ-4, CI-4 Plus, CH-4, CF-4,CF/SM, = 73,520 psi
zinc = 1519 ppm
phos = 1139 ppm
moly = 80 ppm

136. 15W40 MOBIL DELVAC 1300 SUPER Diesel Oil conventional, API CJ-4, CI-4 Plus, CI-4, CH-4/SM, SL = 73,300 psi
zinc = 1297 ppm
phos = 1944 ppm
moly = 46 ppm

137. 15W40 Farm Rated Heavy Duty Performance Diesel Oil conventional CI-4, CH-4, CG-4, CF/SL, SJ = 73,176 psi
zinc = 1325ppm
phos = 1234 ppm
moly = 2 ppm

138. 5W30 Amalie Elixir Oil, API SN, synthetic = 72,825 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

139. 5W20 Valvoline SynPower, API SN, GM dexos 1 approved = 72,581 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This was the latest current version of this oil when tested Fall 2015.

140. 15W40 “NEW” SHELL ROTELLA T Diesel Oil conventional, API CJ-4, CI-4 Plus, CH-4, CF-4,CF/SM = 72,022 psi
zinc = 1454 ppm
phos = 1062 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

141. Brad Penn, Penn Grade 1 Nitro 70 Racing Oil semi-synthetic = 72,003 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

142. 0W30 Mobil 1 Racing Oil = 71,923 psi
zinc = 1693 ppm
phos = 1667 ppm
moly = 1326 ppm

143. 0W20 Kendall GT-1, with liquid Titanium, API SN, synthetic = 71,385 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested in Spring 2016.

144. 0W30 Brad Penn, Penn Grade 1, partial synthetic = 71,377 psi
zinc = 1621 ppm
phos = 1437 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

145. 15W40 “OLD” SHELL ROTELLA T Diesel Oil conventional, API CI-4 PLUS, CI-4, CH-4,CG-4,CF-4,CF,SL, SJ, SH = 71,214 psi
zinc = 1171 ppm
phos = 1186 ppm
moly = 0 ppm
Yes it’s true, the old Rotella actually has LESS zinc than the new Rotella.

146. 10W30 Brad Penn, Penn Grade 1, partial synthetic = 71,206 psi
zinc = 1557 ppm
phos = 1651 ppm
moly = 3 ppm

147. 15W40 VALVOLINE PREMIUM BLUE HEAVY DUTY DIESEL Oil conventional, API CJ-4, CI-4 Plus, CI-4, CH-4, CG-4, CF-4, CF/SM = 70,869 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

148. 5W20 Castrol Edge Extended Performance, API SN, GM dexos 1 approved, synthetic (gold bottle) = 70,417 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This was the latest current version of this oil when tested Fall 2015.

149. 15W50 Mobil 1, API SN synthetic = 70,235 psi
zinc = 1,133 ppm
phos = 1,168 ppm
moly = 83 ppm

150. 10W40 Resolute All Season Motor Oil, API SN conventional = 69,709 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil cost $2.49 per quart when bought for this test. It is a Regional Oil from the Mid-Western U.S. farm country.

151. 5W40 CHEVRON DELO 400LE Diesel Oil synthetic, API CJ-4, CI-4 Plus, CI-4, SL, SM = 69,631 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

152. 5W40 Liqui Moly Leichtlauf High Tech Oil, synthetic = 69,580 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil is made in Germany and is available in the U. S. It comes in 1 Liter bottles which is slightly more than a quart.

153. 0W40 Castrol Edge with Syntec, API SN, European Formula, made in Belgium and sold in the U.S., synthetic (black bottle) = 69,307 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

154. 0W30 Castrol Edge with Syntec, API SL, European Formula, made in Germany and sold in the U.S., synthetic (black bottle) = 69,302 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

155. 30wt Edelbrock Break-In Oil conventional = 69,160 psi
zinc = 1545 ppm
phos = 1465 ppm
moly = 4 ppm

156. 5W30 High Performance Lubricants Break-In Oil, synthetic = 69,097 psi
zinc = the bottle claims high zinc
phos = the bottle claims high phos
moly = TBD
This oil was tested Summer 2016.

157. 5W30 Motorcraft, API SN synthetic = 68,782 psi
zinc = 796 ppm
phos = 830 ppm
moly = 75 ppm

158. 10W40 Edelbrock synthetic = 68,603 psi
zinc = 1193 ppm
phos = 1146 ppm
moly = 121 ppm
This oil is manufactured for Edelbrock by Torco.

159. 5W30 Quaker State Advanced Durability, API SN, conventional = 68,581 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested Fall 2015

160. 5W30 Toyota Motor Oil, API SN conventional = 68,069 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

161. 5W40 SHELL ROTELLA T6 Diesel Oil, synthetic, API CJ-4, CI-4 Plus, CI-4, CH-4, SM, SL = 67,804 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

162. 10W30 Champion Racing Oil, synthetic blend = 67,239 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

163. 10W30 ProHonda HP4S, 4 Stroke Motorcycle Oil, API SJ, synthetic = 66,852 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested Fall 2015

164. 15W40 LUCAS MAGNUM Diesel Oil, conventional, API CI-4,CH-4, CG-4, CF-4, CF/SL = 66,476 psi
zinc = 1441 ppm
phos = 1234 ppm
moly = 76 ppm

165. 15W40 CASTROL GTX DIESEL Oil, conventional, API CJ-4, CI-4 Plus, CI-4, CH-4, CG-4, CF-4/SN = 66,323 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

166. 10W30 Royal Purple HPS (High Performance Street), synthetic = 66,211 psi
zinc = 1774 ppm
phos = 1347 ppm
moly = 189 ppm

167. 5W30 Schaeffer Supreme 7000 Synthetic Plus, API SN = 66,099 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil was tested Fall 2015

168. 10W40 Valvoline 4 Stroke Motorcycle Oil, API SJ, conventional = 65,553 psi
zinc = 1154 ppm
phos = 1075 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

169. 15W40 Swepco 306 Supreme Formula Engine Oil, with Dimonyl, conventional, API CI-4/SL, CF-2 = 65,185 psi
This oil is from Southwestern Petroleum Corporation.
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

170. 5W30 Klotz Estorlin Racing Oil, API SL, synthetic = 64,175 psi
zinc = 1765 ppm
phos = 2468 ppm
moly = 339 ppm

171. “ZDDPlus” added to Royal Purple 20W50, API SN, synthetic = 63,595 psi
zinc = 2436 ppm (up 1848 ppm)
phos = 2053 ppm (up 1356 ppm)
moly = 2 ppm (up 2 ppm)
The amount of ZDDPlus added to the oil, was the exact amount the manufacturer called for on the bottle. And the resulting psi value here was 24% LOWER than this oil had BEFORE the ZDDPlus was added to it. Most major Oil Companies say to NEVER add anything to their oils, because adding anything will upset the carefully balanced additive package, and ruin the oil’s chemical composition. And that is precisely what we see here. Adding ZDDPlus SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCED this oil’s wear prevention capability. Just the opposite of what was promised.

172. 5W30 PurOl Elite Series, synthetic = 63,282 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

173. Royal Purple 10W30 Break-In Oil, conventional = 62,931 psi
zinc = 1170 ppm
phos = 1039 ppm
moly = 0 ppm

174. 10W40 Crane Cams Break-In Oil, conventional = 62,603 psi
zinc = TBD, but claims high zinc formula
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

175. 10W30 Lucas Hot Rod & Classic Hi-Performance Oil, conventional = 62,538 psi
zinc = 2116 ppm
phos = 1855 ppm
moly = 871 ppm

176. 5W30 Motul 8100 ECO-nergy, API SL, synthetic = 61,880 psi
This oil is made in France, and comes in a 1 liter bottle, which = 1.05 qts
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
For reference, 5W30 Motul 300V Ester Core 4T Racing Oil, synthetic, produced a wear protection capability of 112,464 psi

177. 0W20 Klotz Estorlin Racing Oil, API SL, synthetic = 60,941 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

178. 10W30 Comp Cams Muscle Car & Street Rod Oil, synthetic blend = 60,413 psi
zinc = 1673 ppm
phos = 1114 ppm
moly = 67 ppm
This oil is manufactured for Comp Cams by Endure.

179. 10W40 Torco TR-1 Racing Oil with MPZ, conventional = 59,905 psi
zinc = 1456 ppm
phos = 1150 ppm
moly = 227 ppm

180. 10W40 Summit Racing Premium Racing Oil, API SL = 59,483 psi
This oil is made for Summit by I.L.C.
zinc = 1764 ppm
phos = 1974 ppm
moly = 41 ppm
NOTE: This oil line was discontinued in Spring 2013.

181. 10W40 Edelbrock, conventional = 59,120 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD
This oil is manufactured for Edelbrock by Torco.

182. 10W40 Spectro Motor-Guard High Performance Motorcycle Oil, API SL, conventional = 57,977 psi
zinc = 1800 ppm (claimed on bottle)
phos = 1800 ppm (claimed on bottle)
moly = TBD

183. 10W40 Brad Penn, Penn Grade 1, partial synthetic = 57,864 psi
zinc = TBD, but the bottle claims high zinc
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

184. 0W20 LAT Synthetic Racing Oil, API SM = 57,228 psi
zinc = TBD
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

185. “ZDDPlus” added to O’Reilly (house brand) 5W30, API SN, conventional = 56,728 psi
zinc = 2711 ppm (up 1848 ppm)
phos = 2172 ppm (up 1356 ppm)
moly = 2 ppm (up 2 ppm)
The amount of ZDDPlus added to the oil, was the exact amount the manufacturer called for on the bottle. And the resulting psi value here was 38% LOWER than this oil had BEFORE the ZDDPlus was added to it. Adding ZDDPlus SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCED this oil’s wear prevention capability. Just the opposite of what was promised.
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186. “ZDDPlus” added to Motorcraft 5W30, API SN, synthetic = 56,243 psi
zinc = 2955 ppm (up 1848 ppm)
phos = 2114 ppm (up 1356 ppm)
moly = 76 ppm (up 2 ppm)

The amount of ZDDPlus added to the oil, was the exact amount the manufacturer called for on the bottle. And the resulting psi value here was 12% LOWER than this oil had BEFORE the ZDDPlus was added to it. Adding ZDDPlus SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCED this oil’s wear prevention capability. Just the opposite of what was promised.

187. 30wt Brad Penn, Penn Grade 1, Break-In Oil, conventional = 56,020 psi
zinc = TBD, but the bottle claims high zinc
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

188. 0W Mobil 1 Racing Oil = 55,080 psi
zinc = 1952 ppm
phos = 1671 ppm
moly = 1743 ppm

189. “Edelbrock Zinc Additive” added to Royal Purple 5W30, API SN, synthetic = 54,044 psi
zinc = 1515 ppm (up 573 ppm)
phos = 1334 ppm (up 517 ppm)
moly = 15 ppm (up 15 ppm)
The amount of Edelbrock Zinc Additive added to the oil, was the exact amount the manufacturer called for on the bottle. And the resulting psi value here was a whopping 36% LOWER than this oil had BEFORE the Edelbrock Zinc Additive was added to it. Adding Edelbrock Zinc Additive SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCED this oil’s wear prevention capability. Just the opposite of what was promised.
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190. 10W30 Comp Cams Break-In Oil, conventional = 51,749 psi
zinc = 3004 ppm
phos = 2613 ppm
moly = 180 ppm

191. “Edelbrock Zinc Additive” added to Lucas 5W30, API SN, conventional = 51,545 psi
zinc = 1565 ppm (up 573 ppm)
phos = 1277 ppm (up 517 ppm)
moly = 15 ppm (up 15 ppm)
The amount of Edelbrock Zinc Additive added to the oil, was the exact amount the manufacturer called for on the bottle. And the resulting psi value here was a “breath taking” 44% LOWER than this oil had BEFORE the Edelbrock Zinc Additive was added to it. Adding Edelbrock Zinc Additive SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCED this oil’s wear prevention capability. Just the opposite of what was promised.

192. 15W50 Joe Gibbs Driven BR Break-In oil, conventional = 51,299 psi
NOTE: Total Seal also sells this Break-In Oil with their label on it.
zinc = TBD, but high levels are claimed on the bottle.
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

193. “Edelbrock Zinc Additive” added to Motorcraft 5W30, API SN, synthetic = 50,202 psi
zinc = 1680 ppm (up 573 ppm)
phos = 1275 ppm (up 517 ppm)
moly = 89 ppm (up 15 ppm)
The amount of Edelbrock Zinc Additive added to the oil, was the exact amount the manufacturer called for on the bottle. And the resulting psi value here was 22% LOWER than this oil had BEFORE the Edelbrock Zinc Additive was added to it. Adding Edelbrock Zinc Additive SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCED this oil’s wear prevention capability. Just the opposite of what was promised.
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194. 30wt Lucas Break-In Oil, conventional = 49,455 psi
zinc = 4483 ppm
phos = 3660 ppm
moly = 3 ppm

195. 5W30 Joe Gibbs Driven BR30 Break-In Oil, conventional = 47,483 psi
NOTE: Total Seal also sells this Break-In Oil with their label on it.
zinc = TBD, but high levels are claimed on the bottle.
phos = TBD
moly = TBD

RGMOI – Part 2

Continuing with the motor oil information:

In recent years there have been entirely too many wiped cam lobes and ruined lifter failures in traditional American flat tappet engines, even though a variety of well respected brand name parts were typically used. These failures involved people using various high zinc oils, various high zinc Break-In oils, various Diesel oils, and various oils with aftermarket zinc additives added to the oil. They believed that any high zinc oil concoction is all they needed for wear protection during flat tappet engine break-in and after break-in. But, all of those failures have proven over and over again, that their belief in high zinc was nothing more than a MYTH, just as my test data has shown.

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A high level of zinc/phos is simply no guarantee of providing sufficient wear protection. And to make matters even worse, excessively high levels of zinc/phos can actually “cause” DAMAGE your engine, rather than “prevent” it. Motor Oil Industry testing has found that motor oils with more than 1,400 ppm ZDDP, INCREASED long-term wear. And it was also found that motor oils with more than 2,000 ppm ZDDP started attacking the grain boundaries in the iron, resulting in camshaft spalling (pitting and flaking). The ZDDP value is simply the average of the zinc and the phosphorus values, then rounded down to the nearest 100 ppm (parts per million).

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From those failures where I was able to find out what specific oils were used, it turned out that those were oils I had already performed my Engineering Wear Protection Capability tests on. And all those oils had only provided poor wear protection capability, meaning that if they had looked at my test data before using those oils, they would have known in advance that their engines would be at significant risk of failure with those oils. And that is just what happened.
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A number of people who have had those failures, and some had repeated failures, have contacted me, asking what they can do to prevent that failure in the future. I tell them to forget all that high zinc nonsense and look at my Wear Protection Ranking List. And to select any high ranking oil there, no matter how much zinc it has, because zinc quantity simply does NOT matter. The only thing that matters regarding wear protection, is the psi value each oil can produce in my testing. The higher the psi value, the better the wear protection. I recommend they use the SAME highly ranked oil for break-in and after break-in. It’s that simple.
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WHEN PEOPLE HAVE TAKEN THAT ADVICE, NOT ONE PERSON HAS EVER COME BACK TO ME TO REPORT THAT MY RANKING LIST DID NOT WORK FOR THEM. Since my ranking list has worked in every case to prevent wiped flat tappet lobes and lifters, it can also work for you to provide the best possible wear protection for your engine. My test data is the real deal, it exactly matches real world experience, and it is the best and most complete motor oil comparison data you will ever find anywhere.
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And for those people who have been able to use various high zinc oils without having trouble with their flat tappet engines, that only means that the oil they used had enough wear protection capability for the loads their engines saw at that time. It does not mean they were necessarily using a great oil. And it does not provide any information about how much reserve wear protection capability their oil provided, nor how their oil compares to other oils on the market.
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But, there are some high zinc oils that do provide excellent wear protection. And you can see which ones they are, by looking at my ranking list below.
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LOOKING AT PETROLEUM QUALITY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA (PQIA) INFORMATION, OR  SENDING OIL SAMPLES TO TYPICAL MOTOR OIL LABS LIKE “ALS TRIBOLOGY” OR “BLACKSTONE LABS” IS NOT SUFFICIENT

What many people don’t understand is, that looking at PQIA information, or sending oil samples in to a typical motor oil lab, does NOT tell us everything we need to know about how well a motor oil performs. Some people think that if they look at PQIA on-line, or get a lab printout of their motor oil, that they know everything they need to know. But, that is simply NOT true. Here’s why.

PQIA information might be interesting to look at, but it doesn’t really provide any truly significant or meaningful information beyond what the API certifications of “reputable brands”, already tells us. The wind-up is that API has already done all that for you by granting the appropriate certification to various oils. If an oil’s performance was far enough off to be a problem, it would not meet the requirements for the specific API certification it was being considered for. So, all the end user has to do is look at the bottle of a “reputable brand” for the certification the oil has, and to change the oil at reasonable intervals, which for most street driven vehicles is ideally 5,000 miles. Doing that will provide an engine with the protection it needs in terms of acid neutralization and deposit and/or sludge build-up prevention. But, looking at PQIA, will NOT give you any information at all, about how well a given motor oil can provide wear protection, which is THE most important thing any motor oil does.

Motor oil lab printouts will only provide information such as the amount of metals, the amount of contaminants, the amount of additive package components in the oil, and its viscosity rating in centistokes (cSt) at 100*C (212*F). And the cost for this test is usually around $30.00 US per sample sent in.

According to a Royal Purple Motor Oil Engineer I spoke with a few years ago, he said only people outside of the Motor Oil Industry, use the unprofessional terminology of calling new oil lab tests, virgin oil analysis (VOA), and used oil lab tests, used oil analysis (UOA). The VOA and UOA references are commonly used on Internet Forum discussions about motor oil, even though they are not legitimate names. Even so, in order for the most people to follow along, I’ll continue to use that wrong terminology for a moment here.

For a VOA, you will NOT get any information on absolutely THE most important thing any motor oil does for your engine, and that is PREVENT WEAR. Everything else a motor oil does for your engine, comes AFTER that. There is not one thing in that lab printout that will tell you how good that oil is at preventing wear. And looking at the zinc and phosphorus levels is completely worthless, because as you will see below, those levels DO NOT predict an oil’s wear protection capability, even though countless people have been brainwashed to believe it does. Therefore, you still have no idea if that oil is any good at performing job number one for your engine. So, you are left with guessing, believing Advertising hype, or Internet chatter, as to which oil you should choose for your engine. In other words, you wasted $30.00 for the lab test, plus the cost of shipping, and your time, all for nothing.

If you have a lab printout from when an oil was brand new, and then you get a UOA of that exact same oil, you can compare those two printouts to see how the oil has changed during that particular change interval. There is definitely some value to that, for indications of engine health, how much of the factory additive package has been depleted, etc. But, it still doesn’t provide any meaningful direct information about how that motor oil compares to other motor oils in terms of wear protection. And if you do see extra metal quantity in the used oil that might be of concern, it is too late, because you are looking at results after the fact. Wear and/or damage has already begun. That is like closing the barn door after the horse already got out. And you still wouldn’t know if the extra metal is because of a poor choice of motor oils  or because of a mechanical problem.

So, you need something FAR BETTER than looking at PQIA info or motor oil lab printouts for selecting the best motor oil for your engine, if you are interested in the best possible wear protection for it.

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That something FAR BETTER, is the independent and unbiased Engineering testing I perform at a representative OPERATING OIL TEMPERATURE to establish motor oil wear protection capability.

Motor oils are derived from base oil stocks, which is a generic oil base that is modified with an additive package to produce a lubricant with the desired properties. A base stock oil with no additive package would perform quite poorly. Base oil stocks are classified by the API (American Petroleum Institute) and fall into one of the categories below:

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• Group I and II – are conventional mineral oils derived from crude oil.

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• Group III – is a highly refined conventional mineral oil made through a process called hydrocracking. This group of oil is allowed to be called a synthetic oil in North America.

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• Group IV – are true synthetic oils, known as PAO (Polyalphaolefin).
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• Group V – are synthetic base stocks other than PAO’s, which include esters and other compounds.
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People on Internet discussions argue endlessly over the merits or lack thereof, of these oil Groups, to try and determine which oil type is best to use. But, with my Engineering tests, you can bypass all that debate, and go directly to the results of how oils you find on Auto Parts Store shelves, actually perform when put to the test. My testing is a dynamic friction test under load, similar to how an engine dyno test is a dynamic HP/Torque test under load. Both tests show how their subjects truly perform in the real world, no matter what Brand names are involved, no matter what outrageous claims may have been made, and no matter what their spec sheets say.

The resulting breakthrough data used in the Wear Protection Ranking List is NOT my opinion, and it is NOT my theory. The data is the result of the Physics and Chemistry involved in the testing. I am only the messenger. The Science is what tells us how these oils perform. And no one can argue with Physics and Chemistry.

You can see my entire 195 motor oil “Wear Protection Ranking List”, which EXACTLY matches real world severe over-heating experience, real world Track experience, real world flat tappet break-in experience, and real world High Performance Street experience (test data validation doesn’t get any better than this), along with additional motor oil tech FACTS, that CANNOT be found anywhere else, by reading below.

Really Good Motor Oil Information

There is a blog about motor oils that is simply second to none and I want to share that with you: https://540ratblog.wordpress.com/

The information itself is something that you have to read through, compare and comprehend to fully understand his testing methodology. I have been studying his information now for about a year and it has certainly helped me to understand that for all of the Madison Avenue hype on motor oils, (which if you noticed lately you don’t see the amount of advertising that you once did) a lot of the claims that they make are really bogus.

From “Tech Facts, Not Myths”

MOTOR OIL ENGINEERING TEST DATA

The date June 20, 2013 just above, is the date this Blog was first started, NOT the date of the information included. It is regularly updated with the latest information, as indicated by the date several paragraphs below.

NOTE: The motor oil wear protection test data included in this Blog is from performance testing of many different motor oils, which shows how they compare relative to each other. The focus is on the motor oils themselves. Therefore, the resulting comparison data applies to ANY engine that uses the oils included here, no matter if the engine is used for racing, daily driving, grocery getting, watercraft, or any other activity.

Before we get into motor oil tech, let’s briefly touch on a little background info. That way people will better understand who I am and where I’m coming from. Here are my credentials:

Mechanical Engineer

U.S. Patent Holder (Mechanical device designed for Military Jet Aircraft)

Member SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers)

Member ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers)

Lifelong Gear Head, Mechanic, Hotrodder, Drag Racer, and Engine Builder

I’m a working Professional Degreed Mechanical Engineer, and Mechanical Design Engineering is what I do for a living. A Mechanical Engineer is clearly the most qualified Engineer to test motor oil that was formulated by Chemical Engineers, for wear protection capability between mechanical components under load. But, as you will see below, the following write-up is not intended to be a chapter out of an Engineering textbook. And the intended audience is not other Engineers. There are no formulas, equations, charts or graphs. The intended audience includes Mechanics, Automotive Enthusiasts, Gear Heads, Hotrodders, Racers and Engine builders. So, it is written in normal everyday spoken language, rather than overly technical jargon. That way, it will be the easiest to follow and understand by the widest possible audience. And some key points will be “intentionally” reiterated from time to time as the information presented here progresses, to emphasize those points.

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** This Blog now has over 255,000 “views” worldwide!! Surpassing the incredible quarter of a million views milestone, clearly shows how popular this Blog is all over the world.
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Its view count has been increasing by nearly 10,000 views per month. And the highest number of views on a single day took place on November 6, 2015 when 996 views were recorded. Of course simply listing the number of views by itself, is not intended to indicate validation of the test data (validation is shown throughout the Blog). But, indicating the number of views does show that an enormous number of people worldwide recognize the value, understand the importance, and make use of the motor oil test data FACTS included here, that cannot be found anywhere else. And as a result, they are posting and sharing links to this Blog, all over the world.

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!! THE INFO ON THIS BLOG WAS LAST UPDATED ON January 5, 2017 !!

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• The view count above, was updated.

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NOTE: All oils used in the testing here, were purchased in the U.S.A., unless otherwise specified.
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BRIEF TECH INTRO:
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The absolute MOST important capability of any motor oil, is to PREVENT WEAR!!! And that capability is determined by its proprietary additive package formulation which includes the extreme pressure anti-wear components. Everything else a motor oil does, comes AFTER that. And everything else a motor oil does, is in “back-up support” of preventing wear. For example, preventing acid formation, ultimately prevents wear. Preventing deposit build-up, maintains oil flow and lubrication, preventing wear. Preventing sludge build-up, maintains oil flow and lubrication, preventing wear. Minimizing air bubbles/foam, keeps the oil mostly liquid oil which is required for proper lubrication, preventing wear, etc, etc. You get the idea.

Motor oil exists in “TWO” forms inside an engine, under which it needs to protect against wear. They are as follows:

1. “Liquid oil” which can be defined as oil thick enough to drip, run, pour or flow.

2. An “oil film” can be defined as a coating of oil too thin to drip, run, pour or flow.

An example of oil in “liquid” form, is in the rod and main bearing clearance, where the incompressible hydrodynamic liquid oil wedge is formed between the crankshaft journals and its bearing shells, as the oil is pulled in by the rotating crankshaft. Oil pressure does not keep the parts separated. Oil pressure serves only to supply oil to be pulled in between the parts.

The fact is, liquids cannot be compressed to allow metal to metal contact, so parts are kept separated and no wear or damage can take place. In liquid form, it does not matter what the oil’s viscosity is, what brand it is, how hot it is, nor how much it costs. Because in the incompressible liquid form, all motor oils provide the same unsurpassed wear protection.

A mere “film of oil”, is the last line of defense against metal to metal contact, and the subsequent wear and/or damage that can follow. An example of an oil film is between non-roller flat tappet lifters and cam lobes of traditional pushrod American V-8 engines, or in DOHC engines between the cam lobes and non-roller type followers they may use. But, it is most critical in pushrod engines which typically use large single intake and single exhaust valves with stiff valve springs, compared to DOHC engines which often use two smaller intake and two smaller exhaust valves with lighter and smaller valve springs. In these locations, no incompressible hydrodynamic liquid oil wedge can be formed because of the wide open parts configuration. And the oil present is simply pushed aside, leaving only a film of oil between the parts with a very thin, highly loaded “line contact” between the parts.

Since “all liquid oils” are incompressible and thus provide unsurpassed wear protection, there is nothing to test for comparisons between different oils in liquid form. My Engineering Tests evaluate the much more critical oil film strength/load carrying capability/shear resistance, which as mentioned above, is the last line of defense before metal to metal contact takes place.

No reliable comprehensive information had been available for this capability comparison, until I began my dynamic motor oil testing, under load, at a representative operating temperature. I perform those Engineering Wear Protection Tests to find out where the motor oil film strength, load carrying capability, shear resistance “limits” are for each individual motor oil. That’s what we compare. The higher the limit, given in PSI, the better the wear protection.

“Film strength, load carrying capability, shear resistance” performance is where motor oil wear protection capability VARIES WIDELY depending on a given oil’s proprietary formulation. And it is at the film strength level, where oils can be evaluated and compared, for those different wear protection capabilities. This is where good oils are separated from not so good oils.

Only dynamic wear testing under load, at a normal operating temperature, can reveal how the various motor oils truly compare regarding wear protection. So, that is precisely what I do to discover the facts. And that is why merely looking at an oil’s spec sheet is worthless. A spec sheet cannot show you an oil’s wear protection capability, because Engineering tests and real world experience have proven over and over again, that the zinc level does NOT matter. That is only a MYTH that has been repeated a million times until people just assume is true, which it is not. Only the psi value from my test data will actually show us how motor oils truly perform regarding wear protection.

My test data EXACTLY matches real world severe over-heating experience, real world Track experience, real world flat tappet break-in experience, and real world High Performance Street experience. Test data validation doesn’t get any better than this.

Bottom Line: You simply cannot find better information anywhere else, on “THE” most critical motor oil capability, which is wear protection. For all the comparison data, see my Wear Protection Ranking List below in this Blog.

But, there could be some confusion for people who do not actually read my entire Blog. My test data on wear protection is generally aimed at High Performance and Racing engines that are capable of pushing motor oils near their limits. So, knowing how capable various oils truly are, can be critical. It is of course also for people who simply want to know what oils will provide the best possible wear protection for their engines, even if they don’t technically push their motor oil near its limit.

However, for ordinary daily driver vehicles, the oil used is nowhere near as critical as it is for High Performance and Racing engines. So, a normal daily driver vehicle may operate just fine for the life of the engine on say a low performing 60,000 psi motor oil. But, a High Performance or Racing engine may require a high performing 90,000 psi or higher motor oil, to avoid wear and/or damage. It just depends on how much loading the engine puts on its motor oil.

And the better performing the oil, the higher the reserve wear protection capability, also called margin of safety, which means capability beyond what is actually required. If you have a problem at some point, say an engine component starts to fail, or the oil level gets low, or there is an overheating condition, or you increase the power level dramatically, etc, etc, then extra reserve wear protection capability could save your engine. So, people have to decide for themselves how much wear protection capability they feel comfortable with for any given engine build. And since you have to buy oil anyway, why not select a better performing motor oil while you are at it?
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Additional motor oil technical info:
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Oil is not the same temperature throughout a running engine, the highest oil temps will typically be found in the incompressible “liquid” oil wedge formed as the oil is pulled into the clearance of the rod and main bearings. That is because, the oil at those locations is being heavily loaded on the power stroke, while at the same time, being sheared. Oil at these locations can be 50* to 90* hotter than sump temperatures.
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During the very brief time interval that oil is flowing through the rod and main bearings, most oils will momentarily reach and exceed their thermal breakdown points. And the cooler the oil starts out, the lower the max temp it reaches there. This is where oils with a higher onset of thermal breakdown point, offer some benefit. Because the less often an oil reaches its breakdown point, and the lower the max temp reached above that point, the longer its capability will remain near new oil level. This means that oils with higher onset of thermal breakdown points, can go longer between oil changes, with regard to thermal deterioration. However, oils with more modest thermal breakdown points can also be used without issue, as long as reasonable oil change intervals are followed, to stay ahead of any significant thermal deterioration.
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The oil on the cylinder walls is not subjected to the burning combustion temperatures as some might think, because very nearly all oil has been scrapped off the cylinder walls by the oil rings, and is not present during combustion. If any significant amount of oil was still on the cylinder walls during combustion, the exhaust pipes would be blowing blue smoke.
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When the piston is at TDC, the cylinder walls are coated with oil from all the oil spraying and flying around inside the crankcase. But, as the piston moves downward, the piston skirt scrapes off excess bulk oil, and the lower oil ring of a multi-piece oil ring, scrapes additional oil off the cylinder wall like a squeegee scraping water off a windshield. So, there is a layer of liquid oil between the piston skirt and the cylinder wall (its thickness depends on the piston to cylinder clearance), not just merely an oil film like you would see between a non-roller flat tappet lifter and its cam lobe. And any oil the lower oil ring doesn’t scrape off, the top oil ring of the multi-piece oil ring, will scrape off, directing it through the oil ring expander/spreader and through the oil holes in the piston.

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Piston ring spring tension against the cylinder walls is NOT what seals the rings against combustion, like most people think. There is no possible way that a mere few pounds of ring spring tension alone, could keep the rings in proper contact with the cylinder walls during the high pressure of combustion. The fact is, rings are kept in contact with the cylinder walls during combustion primarily by the tremendous combustion pressure itself, which is typically well over 1,000 psi, depending on the particular engine. The rings’ spring tension does keep the rings in contact with the cylinder walls enough to direct the high combustion pressure through the ring side clearance above, and then on behind the rings’, to their inside diameter back clearance. And it is this force “behind the rings” that presses the rings out against the cylinder wall with enough force to seal the combustion pressure during the power stroke (some racing pistons have gas ports behind the rings just for this purpose). That is why proper ring side clearance and back clearance are very important, as is free ring movement in the pistons’ ring grooves. To ensure free ring movement and make sure that they don’t get gummed up and stuck in the piston ring groves, it is important to use quality fuel and to change the oil at reasonable intervals.
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And remember, cylinder walls are in direct contact with the coolant on their outer surface. So, the cylinders are the most directly cooled parts of an engine, meaning the oil side of the cylinder walls are not anywhere near as hot as many people might think.
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An ideal oil sump temperature range is between 215*F and 250*F. If your sump temperature runs hotter than this range, you should add an oil cooler, or upgrade your oil cooler, if you already have one. This range is hot enough to quickly boil off the normal condensation that always forms during cold engine start-up, before that water dilutes the oil.
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And that range is cool enough to do three things:
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1. It is cool enough to keep the oil’s wear protection capability at the highest level achievable by that oil.
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2. It is cool enough to provide critical cooling for engine components, which of course are directly oil cooled. Remember, engine components are only indirectly water cooled.
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3. It is cool enough to keep most oils below their onset of thermal breakdown point.
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But, motor oils do NOT stop working the instant they reach their onset of thermal breakdown point. However, it is not a good idea to run oil above its thermal breakdown point for extended periods of time. Because that will degrade its capability more and more as time/mileage goes on.